Friday Fallout – November 30, 2012

I stole this from Reddit. I actually buy my own TP.

No toilet paper? No problem!

Hey, the WordPress CMS updated! That’s cool, right? I think so. Also, it is literally beginning to look a lot like Christmas everywhere you go. That’s also cool.

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Warp One…Allocate! – Exile Sun Review

Exile sun box cover

Exile sun, won’t you come…and wash away the game.

When I moved out of my parent’s house, I moved in with a guy I knew in college. Being mostly penniless I had to use a lot of tools and items that he already owned, including the can opener. The problem was his can opener didn’t work very well. When I told him this, he insisted that it DID work if I held it a certain way and turned the crank with a steady motion. And after some practice I found that he was right. The can opener worked when you learned how to deal with it’s little eccentricities. But a better solution would have just  been to buy a new can opener. That’s how I feel about Exile Sun. It functions if you are willing to learn how to make it work, but it hardly seems worth the trouble. Continue reading

Bits and Pieces

Dice ahoy

Rollin’, rollin’, rollin’.

Have you been following the ongoing drama of Glory to Rome? The original game by Carl Chudyk has been a gamer favorite for several years, but it’s impossible to have any conversation about the game that doesn’t eventually come back to the artwork. Cartoony, garish, and loaded with gradients, Glory to Rome wasn’t exactly easy on the eyes. Cambridge Games sensed an opportunity to Kickstart a do-over of the artwork. The ensuing fracas over the protracted production cycle of this reprint could fill its own article. But it’s hard to argue with the new look of the game, now rendered in stylish black and white with appropriate splashes of color. It makes the game look far more professional and attractive. There’s just one problem: I kind of miss the old artwork. Continue reading

Friday Fallout – November 16, 2012

christmas cat

Let’s wait until after Thanksgiving, hmmm?

My article on F:AT didn’t run last week, so that meant that I already had one lined up for this week. That’s why you didn’t hear from me this week: I didn’t have deadline fear. And my excuse for posting late today? I usually punch this thing out over my lunch break, but our internet was completely out from about 10 AM on. It’s still technically Friday now, right? Continue reading

The Rumpus Room’s Top Twelve – 2012 Edition

Here we are once again, at roughly that time of year where I like to post my twelve favorite games! It’s hard to believe that this blog has operated in some form for over two years, but here we are. This list has become an annual tradition, but this year I took a different approach. Rather than just assuming that I knew what my favorite games were, I instead made a list of games that I thought should be in any conversation about my favorite games of all time. One by one, I would take one game and roughly insert it where I felt like it belonged at this point in my gaming life. That means that this list is a snapshot of my gaming tastes right now, which is far more interesting than some feeble attempt at objectivity. As such, there was some movement in my favorites, and some games from the previous two years have fallen into the “honorable mention” category, or off the list altogether. So without further ado, I give you… Continue reading

I Bid You Welcome – Fury of Dracula Review

Fury of Dracula cover

The children of the night…what music they make.

At this point in popular culture, it’s hard to swing a stick without running into something about vampires. And as is always true when something reaches cultural saturation, it descends into parody. The ubiquity of the Twilight franchise has rendered vampires just a little less overdone than zombies. It’s easy to forget that vampire literature has a much richer history, one that is steeped in atmosphere and darkness. One has only to see Murnau’s Nosferatu or Tod Browning’s classic Dracula with Bela Lugosi to see the possibilities for the genre. They eschew cheap scares for moodiness and quiet dread.  Continue reading