You got a reaction, didn’t you? – Get Behind Me Satan (2005)


After rising to genuine rock star status after Elephant, the White Stripes used their follow-up as an opportunity to take a hard left turn. Get Behind Me Satan is a weird album that opens with several songs that don’t sound anything like earlier White Stripes albums. Over a decade removed from its original release, it still stands as the strangest album the band would ever record.  Continue reading


Find me a soapbox where I can shout it – Elephant (2003)


If The White Stripes are remembered for one song, that song will almost certainly be “Seven Nation Army.” The opening track to their fourth album Elephant is one of the great guitar hooks in rock history, ranking beside “Satisfaction,” “Smoke On The Water,” and “Whole Lotta Love.” It’s also one of those rare rock songs that has become a stadium anthem around the world. Apart from its impact, it is easily one of the best songs The White Stripes recorded, a tightly coiled ball of menace with the heartbeat of Meg’s drumming pushing it forward relentlessly. And for the first time on a White Stripes album, we get a blistering guitar solo from Jack. But the biggest miracle is that, as terrific as “Seven Nation Army” is, it probably isn’t even the best song on Elephant. The fourth album by The White Stripes is a rock miracle, a back-to-front masterpiece that has at least five classic Stripes tracks, and a pack of album tracks that all feel part of the whole. Continue reading

Shiny Tops and Soda Pops – White Blood Cells (2001)


The heavy blues influence on the first two White Stripes albums is well-executed and thrilling, but it does give those albums a sense that they are riffs on a common idea. Jack White is far from the first white boy to discover the blues, and lo-fi aesthetic notwithstanding, the broad sound of those early albums comes off a bit like grimy Zeppelin. It’s really well done, but it’s not quite a unique voice yet. Continue reading